JOSEPH LEHN ANTIQUE FRAMES
1508 51St. S.
Gulfport,FL 33707
HOW TO FIND THE RIGHT FRAME FOR YOUR PAINTING.
 
1. If possible, get the book THE RIGHT FRAME and benefit from the wisdom of Henry Heydenryk.
 
2. Give some thought to what kind of frame you would like on your picture bearing in mind the ultimate disposition of the framed artwork.  For instance, will you retain in private collection or, if a dealer, consign to auction or display for sale?  Also consider the importance and value of the picture, market or sentimental, with a view to identifying how much to spend on a frame.
 
3.  Send me an image of your artwork, along with the appropriate dimensions (height, width, thickness) along with your preferences to  
jlehn6@tampabay.rr.com.  To help you visualize the right frame you might like to check out the FRAME DISPLAYS page in this web site showing various frame styles.
 
4.  I will check my inventory for an appropriate frame. 
 
5. If a suitable frame is found in inventory I will return email a virtual frame presentation along with a detailed description and price.
 
6. If this procedure identifies the right frame for you and agreement is reached as to price, I will prepare the frame to accept your picture with any adjustments needed, such as outright cutting to size or adjusting the rear opening.  The frame will arrive at your doorstep with all necessary clips, swivel eyes and wire to both mount and hang your picture.  You will need only to insert your picture and tighten the clips.
 
7. If the frame does not meet your expectations, you are under no obligation.  Simply return to me within three business days. 
    I will ask however that you bear all shipping expenses.
 
8. If I can not find a suitable frame you might wish to check the reputable firms listed on my LINKS page.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Source: THE RIGHT FRAME - Henry Heydenryk.
CUSTOMER IMAGE.
FRAME FROM INVENTORY
PRESENTATION EMAILED TO CUSTOMER
HAPPY CUSTOMER
TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR THE PROPER FRAMING OF PICTURES
 
 
1. The width and pattern of the molding must bear relationship to the design and "weight" of the picture.  A painting with simple, uncomplicated design calls for a plain molding; a much-detailed composition is best balanced by a rich design in the frame, with ornamentation called for.
 
2. A receding molding (one slanting toward the wall) or a rather flat profile will suit two-dimensional paintings best.
 
3. A concave molding (one slanting toward the painting) will enhance the feeling of perspective suggested by a composition in depth.
 
4. Strong, bold patterns (such as in Roualt's paintings) demand powerful lines in the frame, to contain the composition.
 
5. A delicate, feathery, airy composition (such as a Vertes) calls for the same"frivolous" feeling in the frame.
 
6. A linear composition (such as a Feininger) calls for a repeat of this fine, lineal quality in the frame.
 
7. Inserts, or contrasting colors, will help to separate the ornamentation or pronounced color in a frame from those in the picture and will enhance the feeling of perspective.
 
8. Mats for watercolors and prints should be chosen to accentuate the significant colors.  White is seldom ever right, because it tends to flatten the picture and darken it by contrast.
 
9. Only in the matter of glass protection do pastels and watercolors call for special treatment.  A gouache can be as strong in color and pattern as any oil, and should be framed accordingly.
 
 
10. Key the colorings in frames to hues in the picture.  A general guide is that warmly toned pictures (in which reds, browns and yellows predominate) are most appropriate in warm-tone frames; whereas cool colors (blues, greens, blue-blacks, whites) are likely to go best in frames that have silvery or similar cool tones.